29
April

What is Haiga?

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With the ever-rising popularity of haiku, you may have seen haiku paired with art. The art could be a painting, a sketch or even a photograph. As you might expect, there’s actually a name for this and it’s “haiga”. Haiga is a natural and wonderful extension of haiku.

A Traditional Haiga:  A Little Cuckoo Across a Hydrangea by Yosa Buson.

A Traditional Haiga: A Little Cuckoo Across a Hydrangea by Yosa Buson.

The word means “haikai drawing”, and it is a style of Japanese painting that merges both image and words. They are typically painted by haiku poets and were accompanied by a haiku poem. Haiga celebrate simple, yet profound observations of the everyday world. While traditional haiga were painted using traditional Japanese implements and methods, haiga styles vary widely and were often quite unorthodox.

Traditional haiga are still produced today. However, many contemporary artists, particularly in the Western world, create haiga with modern technology coupling haiku with digital imagery, photography or other forms of media. See my attempt at haiga at the top of this post. Other examples of excellent haiga can be found on Sannel Larson’s blog, Sannel’s World of Poetry. Please give it a look and don’t forget to leave a comment. Bloggers live for comments! 😀

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19
April

dylanthomasquotedylan-thomas

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14
April

Photinia Blossoms

Photinia

Photinia X Fraseri
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Photo: Rick Stephen - 13-April-2013

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9
April

The Spoken Word – Poets in Performance

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If you enjoy poetry, I’ve no doubt you enjoy it most frequently by reading it. “Duh!’, you say, “how else!”. Clearly, that is how most people enjoy it. Reading poetry can be a most entertaining and profound thing. It allows your imagination to take the text wherever it will, maybe where the poet intended, maybe not. That’s the beauty of poetry. It’s open to interpretation through the experiences, biases and prejudices of the reader. Reading poetry is simply a wonderfully moving experience.

I state the obvious. Yes, I know. However, I wonder how many of you have ever attended a poetry reading, festival or other venue where poetry is read out loud. How many of you have enjoyed poetry through the spoken word? It’s an entirely different and moving experience. The imagination is still engaged but in a different way; taken to different places by the tones, inflections, volume, pacing, pauses and the myriad of other ways the human voice can be used in dramatic expression. Indeed, the experience of the same poem can be completely different depending on who reads it, their experiences, biases and prejudices molding their interpretation and performance.

To give you a taste of what I mean, take a look at Bill Moyers’ “Poets in Performance” page on his Moyers and Company website. There you will find over 20 poems read, no performed, aloud by various artists. I’m sure you’ll find it a fascinating and supremely entertaining experience. To quote from Bill Moyers’ own website:

Over the years, Bill Moyers has welcomed some of America’s best poets to share their works and inspiration. Many of those writers have performed at the Geraldine R. Dodge Poetry Festival, which Bill and his colleagues covered for television specials including Fooling with Words (1999), The Language of Life (1995) and Sounds of Poetry (1999). Below, enjoy a showcase of such poetry from past productions and very recently from Moyers & Company, performed by the poets who dreamed them up, or by other artists who, like Bill, simply adore poetry.

My hope is that by listening to poetry this way you not only gain an appreciation for the spoken word but that your enjoyment of poetry in general grows. There is a place for both reading and listening and both are needed. Who knows, maybe you’ll find you enjoy it so much you’ll want attend a live poetry reading, an experience that will take your enjoyment of poetry to a new level. Imagine after having listened to a poet perform a work, you can actually speak with them afterward. Picking their minds a asking them those questions you’ve been dying to ask. So stop “just reading” poetry, start listening. Then start going and asking and writing and performing and … who knows where it will end!

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8
April

Good Monday Morning Rainbow

Good Monday Morning Rainbow

Good Monday Morning Rainbow
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Photo: Rick Stephen - 08-April-2013

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4
April

White Crowned Sparrow

White Crowned Sparrow

White Crowned Sparrow
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Photo: Rick Stephen - 01-April-2013

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2
April

Ladderback Woodpecker

Ladderback Woodpecker

Ladderback Woodpecker
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Photo: Rick Stephen - 01-April-2013

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